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May 13, 2019
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Thompson submachine gun, byname Tommy gun, submachine gun patented in 1920 by its American designer, John T. Thompson. It weighed almost 10 pounds (4.5 kg) empty and fired .45-calibre ammunition. The magazine was either a circular drum that held 50 or 100 rounds or a box that held 20 or 30 rounds.

Many of the infantry rifles employed during World War I boasted superb accuracy at long range. However, their relatively low rate of fire and their overall size (typically more than 5 feet [150 cm] long with bayonet attached) made them unsuitable for the close-quarters combat seen in the trenches of the Western Front. Upon learning of the friction-delayed blowback firing action patented by John Bell Blish in 1915, Thompson, a U.S. Army ordnance officer, sought to incorporate that design into an effective “trench sweeper” weapon. Chambered for .45 calibre—the same cartridge used by the M1911 Colt pistol—Thompson’s “trench sweeper” boasted superb stopping power at the expense of a greatly reduced effective range. By the time Thompson’s prototype was completed, however, World War I had ended.

Although Thompson’s submachine gun received positive evaluations from both the Army and the U.S. Marine Corps, neither service initially opted to purchase it on a widespread basis. Instead, the weapon, popularly dubbed the “Tommy gun,” became infamous during the U.S. Prohibition era (1920–33) for its use by gangsters in bloody incidents such as the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre. Indeed, the Thompson became so widely known in that era that it is commonly (but erroneously) believed to be the first submachine gun. The U.S. Army adopted the Thompson submachine gun in 1928. Both the U.S. and British armies used it in World War II, as at various times have other armed forces.

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Original post published by ENCYCLOPEDIA BRITANNICA on their website

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